U of S, Metropolis of Saskatoon launch 4 sensible analysis initiatives

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The partnership, called Research Junction, gives researchers the ability to access city resources while providing city staff with analysis and data.

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Saskatoon StarPhoenix

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Sep 15, 202129 minutes ago2 minute read Join the conversation The University of Saskatchewan and the City of Saskatoon are progressing on four projects aimed at improving life for the city's residents. The University of Saskatchewan and the City of Saskatoon are progressing on four projects aimed at improving life for the city’s residents. Photo by Liam Richards /Saskatoon StarPhoenix

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The University of Saskatchewan and the City of Saskatoon are making progress on four projects aimed at improving life for the city’s residents.

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The partnership, called Research Junction, gives researchers the ability to access city resources, data and expertise, the U of S said in a release. In turn, it provides city staff with analysis and data used to inform decision making.

“This helps the city tap into the innovation and expertise of the university in addressing fundamental issues shaping our city: overcoming barriers to employment, responsive transit, energy sources for heating and cooling, and how to protect our water treatment plants,” Mayor Charlie Clark said. “The answers will help ensure we are a more resilient and inclusive city into the future.”

Projects funded through the Research Junction also provide learning and research opportunities for U of S students.

“These Research Junction projects offer practical means for both protecting the environment and improving the daily lives of residents,” U of S President Peter Stoicheff said. “Our researchers are committed to finding local solutions, with global impact.”

With a combined funding of $100,000, the projects will be carried out between now and early 2023.

The four projects are:

Addressing social issues, saving taxpayer dollars
Funding: $30,000

Public Policy researcher Marc-Andre Pigeon and Tenille Thomson of the city’s community development division will look at the impact of Build Up Saskatoon in helping address social issues like unemployment and crime and its potential to save government money by doing so.

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Shaping a more responsive transit system
Funding: $20,000

Computer Science researcher Debajyoti Mondal and Saskatoon Transit’s Jim McDonald will work to develop algorithms that analyze Saskatoon Transit data in order to allow city and transit planners to make data-driven decision around optimizing service and better handling emergencies.

Analyzing the feasibility of heat pumps
Funding: $20,000

The College of Engineering’s Carey Simonson and Gurubalan Annadurai join Kathryn Theede from the city’s sustainability department in looking at heat pump’s capabilities in hearing and cooling buildings compared to conventional natural gas systems

Protecting water from contamination
Funding: $20,000

Chemistry researcher Lee Wilson and the Saskatoon Water Department’s Sunday Ibok will examine the susceptibility of key aspects of the water treatment process to potentially dangerous disruptions from petrochemical spills.

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